Why Everything You've Been Told About Meat, Fat & Cholesterol is Wrong

Fact: Fat is Essential

Fact: Fat is Essential

“Fats from animal and vegetable sources provide a concentrated source of energy in the diet; they also provide the building blocks for cell membranes and a variety of hormones and hormone-like substances. Fats as part of a meal slow down nutrient absorption so that we can go longer without feeling hungry. In addition, they act as carriers for important fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K. Dietary fats are needed for the conversion of carotene to vitamin A, for mineral absorption and for a host of other processes.”

“Most people would be surprised to learn that there is, in fact, very little evidence to support the contention that a diet low in cholesterol and saturated fat actually reduces death from heart disease or in any way increase’s one’s life span.”

—Sally Fallon, Nourishing Traditions

Fact: Carbs Fatten, Not Fats

Fact: Carbs Fatten, Not Fats

“…the science itself makes clear that hormones, enzymes, and growth factors regulate our fat tissue, just as they do everything else in the human body, and that we do not get fat because we overeat; we get fat because the carbohydrates in our diet make us fat. The science tells us that obesity is ultimately the result of a hormonal imbalance, not a caloric one—specifically, the stimulation of insulin secretion caused by eating easily digestible, carbohydrate-rich foods: refined carbohydrates, including flour and cereal grains, starchy vegetables such as potatoes, and sugars, like sucrose (table sugar) and high-fructose corn syrup. These carbohydrates literally make us fat, and by driving us to accumulate fat, they make us hungrier and they make us sedentary.”

—Gary Taubes, Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It

Fact: Inflammation Causes Heart Disease

Fact: Inflammation Causes Heart Disease

“Atherosclerosis is not caused by dietary fats and cholesterol; it is caused by chronic out-of-control inflammation.”

“When we have a high blood cholesterol level it means that the body is dealing with some damage. The last thing we should do is interfere with this process! When the damage has been dealt with, the blood cholesterol will naturally go down. If we have an ongoing disease in the body that constantly inflicts damage, then the blood cholesterol will be permanently high. So, when a doctor finds high cholesterol in a patient, what this doctor should do is to look for the reason. The doctor should ask, ‘What is damaging the body, so the liver has to produce all that cholesterol to deal with the the damage?’ Unfortunately, instead of that, our doctors are trained to attack the cholesterol.”

—Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride MD, Put Your Heart in Your Mouth